Posts tagged ‘recycling’

Recycling Symbols, How to Recycle, Disposable Water Bottles…and More, All Made Simple

We found this amazing video that breaks down the major questions regarding recycling many different products.  It talks about whats true and false in the recyling game, all sorts of ways to reduce waste, and how to correctly get rid of volatile items such as batteries.  Give it a viewing and don’t forget to check out the other videos attached to it – great stuff.  Big thanks to Pic.tv and Video Jug for creating and posting this video.  Click on the image below:

video

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September 1, 2009 at 10:34 pm Leave a comment

KOR Hydration Vessel in New Colors

We’ve splashed some new color into our reusable water bottle collection.  Check out the new KOR Hydration Vessels that we recently released – Sawgrass and Orchid Pink.  If you do your part to stop the 10’s of millions of disposable water bottles going into our trash every year, well, that would be just keen.

KORORCHIDPINK

KORSAWGRASS

August 27, 2009 at 4:11 pm Leave a comment

What Does the Recycling Symbol Mean Pt. 6 – The No. 4

The recycling symbol number 4 is telling you that the plastic is made of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) is a thermoplastic made from petroleum (BOO!).  It was the first grade of polyethylene, produced in 1933 by Imperial Chemical Industries (ICI) using a high pressure process via free radical polymerisation [1]. Its manufacture employs the same method today.  LDPE is supposedly commonly recycled, but we can’t find a citation indicating any proof or research done to substantiate the claim.

4

LDPE is widely used for manufacturing various containers, dispensing bottles, wash bottles, tubing, plastic bags for computer components, and various molded laboratory equipment. Its most common use is in plastic bags. Other products made from it include:

* Trays & general purpose containers
* Food storage and laboratory containers
* Corrosion-resistant work surfaces
* Parts that need to be weldable and machinable
* Parts that require flexibility, for which it serves very well
* Very soft and pliable parts
* Six-pack soda can rings
* Extrusion coating on paperboard and aluminum laminated for beverage cartons.
* Computer components, such as hard drives, screen cards and disk-drives.
* Playground Slides
* Plastic Bags

Remember, no matter what the symbol (which coaxes most people into feeling that the product is safe for the environment because it can be recycled), there are many more factors that play into if this plastic will ever be recycled rather than wasted.  Your local government’s recycling laws are the biggest obstacle to plastics actually being recycled (go find yours at whatever the name of your town or state it with a .gov attached rather than a .com or .net).

The best thing you can do is use products that are made with the environment and your health in mind.  Check out our extensive supply of reusable water bottles and reusable shopping bags at ecosumo.com and help us fight The Disposable Water Bottle Beast.

August 17, 2009 at 1:19 pm Leave a comment

The Good Guide to Reducing Your Water Use, Part 2: Outdoors

eskimo

2A: Lose the Lawn, Water Hogs

Potential water savings: up to 150 gallons per day, per household.

There are much better ways to decorate or shade your turf, and it largely depends on where you live. Here’s a primer.

Planting appropriately is the best way to conserve water and not kill your plants. Much of the Western United States, for example, is built on or near deserts. That means that drought-tolerant planting is key. In the Midwest’s colder climes, you should opt for hardier varieties of flowers and shrubs. Getting creative can save thousands of gallons per year on outside use.

Since 1960, the United States Department of Agriculture has published something called the hardiness zone map—a road map for planting locally. But it doesn’t offer other variables like rainfall, the number of sunny days, and soil conditions. With that in mind, we’ve created our own map of the country, which shows you what to plant and what not to plant, while using the least amount of water.
floweringdogwoodClimate Because rainfall in Brooklyn, New York, for example, averages a healthy 44 inches per year, with a few tweaks, storm runoff and water recycling can take care of all your watering needs.
Local plants Flowering dogwood, highbush blueberry, wild leek, birdfoot violet
Smart landscaping choice Pennsylvania bluestone. A layered sandstone, it originates in the Northeast and is pretty to look at. Best of all? No watering needed.
caliblackClimate Sacramento, California, has a Mediterranean climate with winters that are cool and wet and summers that are hot and dry. As in much of the west, water is scarce, so a synthetic lawn would save water.
Local plants California wild grape, elderberry, California black walnut, coyote brush
Smart landscaping choice An ecologically sound synthetic lawn—seriously, it’s that bad. If you can’t live without real grass go with Eco Lawn, a brand of drought-resistant grasses that require very little watering.
utahhoneyClimate Boise, Idaho, is a city of extremes: hot and dry 90-degree summers and cold snowy winters. As in other nearby cities, rainfall is scarce, so using local plants accustomed to the climate is crucial.
Local plants Western juniper, Utah honeysuckle, prairie junegrass, Rocky Mountain maple
Smart landscaping choice Recycled rubber pavers. A sustainable softscaping option, rubber flooring is easy to install, low-impact, and the recycling diverts it from landfills.
cocopalmClimate As the southernmost city in the continental United States, Key West, Florida, is essentially in the Caribbean, and the same climatic limitations apply. The weather is temperate all year long, but there are dry and wet seasons, and taking advantage of the former is important to keeping your environs thriving.
Local plants Coconut palm, bellflower, Key lime, saw palmetto
Smart landscaping choice Seashell mulch. The mulch functions as a barrier to lock in moisture and prevent evaporation for the dryer season and help prevent excess weed growth.
fishookClimate Tucson, Arizona, which lies in the Sonoran Desert, suffers from serious water issues. It rains during the month-long monsoon season, but not much during the rest of the year. More than half the local golf courses use recycled water.
Local plants Fishhook barrel cactus, desert ironwood, Arizona poppy, Parry’s agave
Smart landscaping choice Permeable concrete pavers. Rain scarcity makes lawns unsustainable without a ton of watering, and permeable pavers send water into the landscape instead of into sewers.

gardengrows2B: Garden Grows

Potential water savings: more than 40 gallons, per household.

A few ways to water your plants and grass without going broke.

First, the good news: There are more tools than ever—like downspouts and 100-percent-recycled plastic cisterns—to harvest every precious drop of water. Now the bad: Not everyone can afford these newfangled products. But don’t fret. You don’t have to be MacGyver to rig up a low-cost alternative.

A Plant-watering Buy

Watering plants too much is as damaging as watering them too little, especially with dwindling water sources. One option is to buy stackable planters by Stack and Grow, which drain water from plant to plant, making sure each one is adequately quenched. It’s also expandable. Just stack up to four additional modules on top of the main unit. They cost around $40 each, and are very nice to look at.

An A/C Plant Watering Hack

Air conditioners drip a little while they’re running, which could mean wasted water and damage to your building’s façade. All A/C window units have a drain hole, so get a basic funnel for a buck at the hardware store, and tape it to the drain. Then, get thin rubber tubing for a few dollars, and tape that to the funnel tip. Run the tube down and place it in an idiot-proof plant. Mint is a great choice. Now you’re watering your plant for free.

A Rain-barrel Buy

For about $100, you can get a Smith & Hawken collapsible rain barrel, which retains up to 35 gallons of water, folds flat for under-bed storage in the off season, and is small enough to fit on a New York terrace. There’s no excuse not to recycle rainwater.

A Rain-barrel Hack

Rain is basically free water. It’s not the cleanest, thanks to pollution, so you wouldn’t want to drink it, but it’s perfectly useable for all your outdoor water needs. If you can get your hands on an old drum, great. If not, any 5-gallon bucket will do. Place the bucket underneath the downspout of your home’s gutter. If you’re a renter, or not near the gutter, just put it anywhere outside. After a nice rain, remove the bucket and save it to water your plants and yard later.

Original article can be found HERE.  Our great thanks to the authors Adam Matthews , Siobhan O’Connor

August 15, 2009 at 2:06 pm Leave a comment

A More Creative Way to ‘Dispose’ of Disposable Water Bottles

Of course, we recommend that you don’t even use disposable water bottles and fuel the Disposable Water Bottle Beast.  However, we are realistic – sometimes you don’t have a choice and water is one of those things humans can’t put off for too long.  And, sometimes your town’s recycling facilities are just a joke.

jellyfishdisposablewaterbottles

So how about Art?  Check out this blog post from Blogher.com where she highlights artists who recycle disposable water bottles into jewelry, eco-art and home accessories.  Pretty amazing stuff.

For reusable water bottle art, check us out at ecosumo.com.  The artist’s will still have plenty of material to work with!  Peace…ecosumo

August 10, 2009 at 12:08 pm Leave a comment

Forget our 2cents…Here’s Ecosumo’s 20oz’s

Okay, so, yeah – we like to see our name parading around on the side of a reusable water bottle.  Forgive us for wanting to be associated with cutting down on waste and hydrating the nation.  Seriously though – our Mom’s would really appreciate if you got yourself an ecosumo reusable water bottle so they can point it out to their friends and say “Isn’t my boy all grown up?”

And then there’s the whole save the planet thing that we all love so much – carrying 20 0z’s of fresh water in your ecosumo reusable water bottle means:

1. Having nearly 3 of your recommended 8 doses of water on you at all times.

2. Stainless Steel is pretty slick for those of you who appreciate a clean style.

3. IT’S NOT DISPOSABLE!  DESTROY THE DISPOSABLE WATER BOTTLE BEAST!

Click on the image below to get yours today.

ecosumoreusablewaterbottle

July 21, 2009 at 3:45 pm Leave a comment

Reusable Water Bottles – No Excuses Not to Have One (OR MORE!)

We’d been going on and on and on about you discontinuing to buy and use disposable water bottles.  And we’re ALWAYS going to be going on and on and on about ridding the planet of disposable water bottles…and now we’re going to present you some very clear and concise alternatives.

Ecosumo carries several different brands and sizes of reusable water bottles for you to purchase and use – whether you’re at home, work, or out playing.  Click on any of the images and/or links below and you’ll be whisked away to a magical website where going Green has never been easier.

1. Check out our own premeire line of ecosumo 20 oz. Reusable Water Bottles.  Available in Blue, Green and Steel.

ecosumoreusablewaterbottle1

2. Or perhaps your thirst is a bit more extreme – maybe you hike or bike and need those extra ounces to keep hydrated?  Try the KOR Hydration Vessel, with a 30 oz. capacity and BPA free.

korhydrationvessel3. There’s also Nalgene’s On-The-Go and Triton models, holding 24 oz. and 32 0z. respectfully.  With a reputation like Nalgene’s, you’ll be assured that the bottle is sturday and you’ll have an odor free container for your fresh water.

nalgeneonthego

4. Finally, check out Nalgene’s Grip-N-Gulp model made specifically for your little ones.  The rubberized lid and smooth mouthpiece make drinking easy while the side grips make holding onto it easy.  (BPA free.)

nalgenegripngo

So get your water in a way that’s healthier for you and Mama Earth.  Order your water bottles today at ecosumo and let’s take the curse of one-time water bottles off our planet.  We’re making it wicked easy for you to get your hands on a reusable water bottle that fits your lifestyle.   In just a few days you can be proud to say you’ve stopped using disposable water bottles.

July 19, 2009 at 7:28 pm Leave a comment

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